This is Amy + Michelle

This is Amy + Michelle

This A.M.

Amy and Michelle became instant friends because of the common interests they share in their love of fashion, food, music and traveling. In This A.M. Amy and Michelle will share recipes, thoughts on eats, their unique fashion style and lifestyles from Toronto to Tampa...... 1,098 miles apart!

Thursday, March 7, 2013

Bernaise or Hollandaise?

This A.M. we have a very important question for you. Bernaise or Hollandaise? If you had eggs Benedict for breakfast you were enjoying it with Hollandaise sauce. Last time you had steak there is a good chance you had it served with Bearnaise sauce. What's the difference between Bearnaise and Hollandaise? I asked some of my friends and family to see what they thought.

Conchi: "Shoot, I get those two confused."

Andrea: "They have different names"

Hoover: "The hollandaise has lemon juice."

Dad: "Bernaise has tarragon."

Arleen: "Oh Dang... Hollandaise is more for asparagus and things and Bearnaise is more for meats?" 

David: "Tarragon!"  

Maria: "Ok...the big difference is the kind of acid in the sauces...Hollandaise has lemon as the acid and bearnaise has wine and white wine vinegar reduced with tarragon and shallots...swear I did not look this up...I love these classic sauces and make them often..."

JoeB: "Oh! let me see,one has Tarragon, one has Eggs, one has Shallots what ever that is????,one has Vinegar, one has Lemon juice and one has White wine vinegar. OH YEA and I didnt even Google it......"

Nikki: "One comes from Holland, and the other is made with bear fat and mayonnaise???? Heeheeee"

Steve: "Well, when I was growing up the only thing we put Hollandaise on was asparagus. It's not just for asparagus?"




I got a lot of good answers (some funny ones too) but I would have to say of all the answers, Maria was absolutely spot on. What I love the most about making these sauces from scratch versus buying a jar, using a packet mix or making a 'quick version' with mayo in the blender is that in 10 minutes time, with just a little bit of effort, you make something gourmet, delicious and better than what is served at most restaurants. The bragging rights are another bonus!

So now that we know the difference between the two sauces what best pairs them with? For Bearnaise, it is traditionally served with steak. I also enjoy it on crabcakes, corn and broccoli. Also, I simply make chicken and rice and top the dish with Bearnaise. On Sunday mornings we like to sleep in and make a late breakfast and one morning we did steak(leftover) and eggs, a side of roasted potatoes and dipped everything in Bearnaise sauce. And for Hollandaise, it is definitely a little milder and that is why it goes so well with just about every type of fish and veggie. Oh and let's not forget, it is amazing on Eggs Benedict!

You know I would never leave you hanging, the recipes for both sauces are below. But don't leave us hanging.... After you try them out, don't forget to let us know your answer to our very important question: Bernaise or Hollandaise?





Bearnaise Sauce

1 green onion, finely chopped
1/4 cup chopped shallots
2 tablespoons fresh chopped tarragon
10 crushed black peppercorns
4 tablespoons white wine vinegar
4 tablespoons sherry
3 egg yolks
3/4 cup butter, cut in pieces, room temperature
dash cayenne pepper
pinch of kosher salt
additional chopped fresh tarragon


Combine onion, shallot, tarragon, peppercorns, vinegar and sherry in a small saute pan. Simmer over medium heat until mixture is reduced by half. In the top half of a double broiler over simmering water, place egg yolks. Strain herb mixture trough a fine sieve into egg yolks, pressing juices out with a spatula. Whisk eggs and mixture until blended. Now add butter piece by piece, not adding another piece until the first one is fully incorporated, whisking the entire time. Don't allow the water in the bottom half of the double boiler to boil, make sure it stays simmering. Once all the butter is mixed in stir in a dash of cayenne, taste test for salt and add some fresh tarragon. Remove from heat and let stand for 3-5 minutes and then serve immediately.


Hollandaise

3 egg yolks
3/4 cup butter, cut in pieces, room temperature
1 tablespoon lemon juice
dash cayenne pepper
pinch of kosher salt

In the top half of a double broiler over simmering water, place beaten egg yolks. Whisk for 1 minute and then add butter piece by piece, not adding another piece until the first one is fully incorporated, whisking the entire time. Don't allow the water in the bottom half of the double boiler to boil, make sure it stays simmering. Once all the butter is mixed in stir in lemon juice, a dash of cayenne and taste test for salt. Remove from heat and let stand for 3-5 minutes and then serve immediately.





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